Tagalog Pronunciation Guide

A description of each phoneme by a Filipino native

  1. kimchi-tan
    *Although I've lived in the Philippines all my life and am Filipino, I'm more fluent in English than Tagalog so I may make some mistakes. Also, this covers the NCR (National Capital Region; where Manila is) accent since some pronunciations are different for other parts of the country. Please feel free to correct me if I describe a phoneme incorrectly!

    Vowels

    a = Short a sound. Similar to the Japanese a
    e = Short e sound. Similar to the Japanese e
    i = Short i sound. Similar to the Japanese i
    o = Short o sound. Similar to the Japanese o
    u = Short u sound. Similar to the Korean u

    Consonants
    k = Similar to the English c/k
    b = Similar to the English b
    d = Similar to the English d
    dy = Similar to the English j
    g = Similar to the English g
    h = Similar to the English h
    l = Similar to the English l
    m = Similar to the English m
    n = Similar to the English n
    ng = Similar to the English ng in words such as "flying" but used as both a starting consonant and ending consonant
    p = Similar to the English p
    r = Trilling r. Similar to the Spanish r
    s = Similar to the English s
    sy = Similar to the English sh
    t = I've noticed that Tagalog t's sound similar to an unaspirated t like the Japanese t
    ts = Similar to the English ch
    w = Similar to the English w
    y = Similar to the English y

    Extras
    Glottal stops between like vowels are important to include in a Tagalog reclist/voicebank since it can change the meaning of the word.