How To: Record Korean Voice Libraries

Want to record a korean UTAU? Here are some resources to get you started!

  1. N.Zo
    Have you wanted to record a Korean voicebank for your UTAU but couldn't find a reclist? Or maybe you found a reclist but you weren't sure how to record the consonants and vowels. Well, this resource will compile most resources needed to record a fully functional Korean voicebank!

    RECORDING AND OTOING
    OTOing Korean (especially VCV) can be daunting, but most recording lists have a base oto. To help with the Recording and OTOing process, I suggest you download Oremo and SetParam
    Oremo: https://osdn.net/downloads/users/3/3800/oremo-english-3.0-b140323.zip/
    SetParam:https://osdn.net/downloads/users/8/8814/setParam-english-3.0-b150713.zip/

    THE RECLIST
    Much like Japanese, English, and other languages, Korean has a plethora of reclists available to use. Whether it be CV, VCV, CVVC, or even VCCV, a korean reclist exists.

    Normally, a CV bank would work best for beginners. It allows you to get into the style of recording Korean.
    Here's a CV Reclist done by SANSYO: https://www.4shared.com/file/ZnRJhxmU/KR_reclist.html

    Up next is CVVC. CVVC gives the same fluidity and possibly more than CV and VCV. CVVC helps best with the sound change rules in Korean.

    Ronnie <UniverseJuice> has made their own CVVC reclist. It has a base oto, pronunciation guide, and an example UST in the directory. It can be found here: http://utaforum.net/resources/korean-cvvc-reclist.183/

    Zetty, a Korean UTAU user, has made a CVVC UST that includes the oto, pronunciation, and it's only 45 samples. Zetty even gives the user some USTs that uses their method of CVVC Korean! Granted, the page is in Korean, but the tutorial is very clear and concise! Personally, I really enjoy this list and think it would be easy to record for more experienced UTAU users. It can be found here: https://zetty123.blog.me/
    (Hint: it'll be under 제티 한국어 CVVC on the left side of the page)

    Furthermore, we have VCCV. VCCV is much like CVVC, but stylized to be USTed and recorded in a slightly different method. VCCV is a really popular method amongst UTAU users, and a large amount of USTs are available.

    E.Via has a wonderful VCCV reclist and tutorial on how to record VCCV korean as well! The reclist also includes a base OTO. The reclist can be found here: https://cafe.naver.com/utauteto/21649
    And the recording guide can be found here: https://gkdus0201.wixsite.com/korutauhp/recording

    Finally, we have VCV Korean. VCV Korean is roughly about 3-4 times bigger than a single Japanese pitch. The most a user has done so far with Korean VCV is 4 pitches.

    Syeon has two VCV korean reclists, one with 7-mora and another with 13 mora (Personally, I think 13 mora is a bit more challenging but a lot faster to record)
    The 7 Mora and 13 mora lists can be found (as well as the OTO files) here: https://cafe.naver.com/utauteto/19223

    PRONUNCIATION
    Korean pronunciation is pretty similar to Japanese.

    E.Via's Pronunciation Guide is the best for people new to the language! It can be found here (this will help for lists CVVC and after) https://gkdus0201.wixsite.com/korutauhp/recording

    The resource covers everything from starting consonants, vowels, ending consonants, and common errors!

    VOWELS
    'a'=japanese 'a' あ
    'i'=japanese 'i'い
    'u'=japanese'u'う
    'e/ae'=japanese'e'え
    'o'=japanese'o'お
    'eo'=ENG VCCV '-9'

    CONSONANTS
    'g'=at the start of a recording, it sounds close to a slightly aspirated 'k'. Afterwards, it is a japanese 'g' sound.
    'n'=a bit tricky to record, place your tongue between your teeth and make an 'n' sound
    'd'=at the start of a recording, it sounds close to a slightly aspirated 't'. Afterwards, it is a japanese 'd' sound.
    'r/l'=at the start of a recording, it sounds close to an english 'l'. Afterwards, it is close to japanese 'r' sound.
    'm'=a bit tricky to record, it is a quick 'm' sound. it is not spread out like an english 'm' (not mma)
    'b'=at the start of a recording, it sounds close to a slightly aspirated 'p'. Afterwards, it is a japanese 'b' sound.
    's'=at the start of a recording, it sounds close to a quick 's' (it sounds a little slight a lisp). Afterwards, it is a japanese 's' sound. When next to a 'y' or a 'i', it makes a 'sh' sound.
    'j'=at the start of a recording, it sounds close to a slightly aspirated 'ch'. Afterwards, it is a japanese 'j' sound.
    'ch'=it is close to an aspirated "ch" sound.
    'k'=it is an aspirated "k" sound.
    't'=it is an aspirated "t" sound.
    'p'=it is an aspirated "p" sound.
    'h'=it is a normal 'h' sound.
    'gg'=it is an unaspirated japanese 'k' sound (っか).
    'dd'=it is an unaspirated japanese 't' sound(った).
    'bb'=it is an unaspirated japanese 'b' sound(っば).
    'ss'=it is very similar to a japanese 's'.
    'jj'=it is a bit tricky to record. It is very close to an unaspirated "ch" sound.

    ENDING CONSONANTS
    '~n'= an english 'n' sound ( a japanese ん before な).
    '~m'= an english 'm' sound( a japanese ん before ま).
    '~ng'= an english 'ng' sound ( a japanese ん before か).
    '~l'= put your tongue in the 'r' position, yet don't move it from the roof of the mouth, and make an 'l' sound.
    '~t'= a bit like a glottal stop, put your mouth at the position to say 't', but don't make the 't' sound. If this is too hard, you can make the 't' sound, but don't have the oto cover the consonant.
    '~k'= a bit like a glottal stop, put your mouth at the position to say 'k', but don't make the 'k' sound. If this is too hard, you can make the 'k' sound, but don't have the oto cover the consonant.
    '~p'= a bit like a glottal stop, put your mouth at the position to say 'p', but don't make the 'p' sound. If this is too hard, you can make the 'p' sound, but don't have the oto cover the consonant.

    That's all I have now for the Resource! If you feel anything needs to be added, please reply!