Where do you start with writing a reclist?

Discussion in 'UTAU Discussion' started by Roenais, Jul 16, 2018.

  1. Roenais

    Roenais Teto's Territory

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    this isnt so much about japanese reclists as theyve been pretty much sorted out, im talking about english and other languages. i have a list of all the vowels and consonants i want to have in my fancy new custom english reclist, and i vaguely know the structure of them, but i have NO clue how to format the reclist. reading through cvvc and vccv lists only confuses me more-- theyve all ended up with an efficient list that includes every combination needed with no redundancy and i dont know where to start OTL

    if youve written a reclist, what do you start with? how do you know where to go next?
     
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  3. Kiyoteru

    Kiyoteru Local Sensei Supporter Defender of Defoko

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    Given that you don't fully understand the structure of existing reclists, I imagine it might be difficult to write one of your own....

    You've already got all your phonemes collected, so that's a start. You'll then want to think about what kind of resulting OTOs you'll want to have in the bank, such as CV, CC, VC, VV, and so on. Maybe you want to include CV for start of phrases and CV for mid-phrase, maybe you'll want to include consonant clusters like CCV or CCCV, maybe you want to have transition VCs and final VCs. For a custom reclist project, it's all about the kind of bank you personally want to use in the end. Then you can start to think about the sample you need to record in order to have those OTOs.

    So let's say that you want simple CV and VC samples, which you can get by recording a sample like "CVC" and then OTOing two parts out of it. Then you could start with one consonant, and match it up to each vowel. For example:
    kak
    kek
    kik
    ...
    etc.
    Once you've done every vowel with one consonant, you go to the next consonant and do every vowel again. The real list may very well end up looking more complicated than this, it's all up to the decisions you make earlier!
     

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